Wedding Invitations /// Kristin & Nick / by Jen Bachelder

It's here. Wedding season.

Well, kind of. It's wedding season in the design world. I've currently got four sets of invitations in the works. I've made a few sets in the past, but this is the first time I've juggled so many. The benefit of working on so many simultaneously is that I've refined my questions for the kick-off meeting (I actually built a Google form into my website). Let's take a closer look at the set that went out the door this week.

Getting Started

One of the first things I do is ask the bride for the link to her wedding Pinterest Board. Everyone's got one, and it helps me get a feel for what they're looking for. If they have multiple invitations pinned, I ask questions hoping to identify the desirable characteristic of each one. This eliminates so much guessing.

No matter how clear a direction I start with, I try to take the language used by the clients and create options for each possible route. For this set, I started at warm, nature-based, and casual as the wedding is taking place outside in June and worked toward cool and simple with less emphasis on the outdoor images. At this point, copy has not been finalized; we're just playing with style options. I walked into the first review with the six options below, hoping to zero in on their final vision.

Good news -- we were really close with options two and three. After deciding on final language, we had the foundational piece that we needed to build the rest of the package. The most time-consuming portion was creating the custom map for the back of the invitation (click on the first image in the strip below for more detail).

Simple ivory A7 envelopes held the formal invitation, RSVP, and bridal party agenda. As an unconditional lover of little details and snail mail, I was pleased to find these complimentary stamps.

Hudson River School forever stamps, clockwise from top left: Thomas Cole, Distant View of Niagara Falls, 1830, The Art Institute of Chicago; Asher B. Durand, Summer Afternoon, 1865, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Frederic Edwin Church, Sunset, 1856, Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute; Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, 1912, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art - See more here.


Hudson River School forever stamps, clockwise from top left: Thomas Cole, Distant View of Niagara Falls, 1830, The Art Institute of Chicago; Asher B. Durand, Summer Afternoon, 1865, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Frederic Edwin Church, Sunset, 1856, Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute; Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon, 1912, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art - See more here.

JenniferBachelderDesign_NickAndKristin_FinalSet.jpg

One down, three to go.


Title Photo: Ben Rosett via unsplash